The bones from dozens of cadavers were used to create these 18th century anatomical wax models

From Wikipedia, Lelli's "flayed" men on display at the Palazzo Poggi

From Elena Manente via Wikipedia; Lelli’s “flayed” men on display at the Palazzo Poggi

Museo di Palazzo Poggi was founded in 1714 to house the Instituto dell Scienze of Bologna. The Anatomical and Obstetrics Collection is located at the Palazzo Poggi and includes eerie rare 18th century anatomical wax works. Some of these wax sculptures include figures created by sculptor Ercole Lelli, (1702-1766) who was considered one of the most talented anatomical artists of his time.

In October 1742, Pope Benedict XIV commissioned The Camera della Notomia (The anatomy room) at the institute to include detailed wax anatomical models. As “figure director” at the Accademia Clementina delle Belle Arti housed in Palazzo Poggi, Lelli was responsible for planning and creating the anatomical wax figures to complete the papal commission, which included eight life-size figures: a male and female nude, and six “flayed men.”

Photo from the Museo di Palazzo Poggi showing Ercole Lelli's anatomical figures.

Photo from the Museo di Palazzo Poggi showing Ercole Lelli’s anatomical figures; click here to see the full size image

The male and female nudes, dubbed “Adam” and “Eve”, bookend the collection. Between the nudes are the flayed men, or écorchés, whose skin and muscles are pulled away to reveal deeper layers of tissue. The final two works are a male and female skeleton, which mirror the Adam and Eve nudes. Lelli’s anatomical figures were built using real human bones wired together, and the models were sculpted in classical poses, similar to marble statues from the same period. To finish the display, Lelli had to the acquire skeletal remains from dozens of cadavers.

From Museo di Palazzo Poggi, Lelli's "flayed men". Click here to see a full size image.

From Museo di Palazzo Poggi, Lelli’s “flayed men”.
Click here to see a full size image.

Sources:

Atlas Obscura

Museo di Palazzo Poggi

The Lady Anatomist

 



Categories: Art and Ephemera

Tags:

1 reply

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: